Discussing dog breeds, dog-adoption, and the human-canine connection.

Monday, June 4, 2012

Consider Adopting a Greyhound



Athletic. Handsome. Intelligent. Affectionate. Loyal.


Good qualities to have in a companion; yours to be adopted if you are the right kind of person to live with a Greyhound.

There are a number of organizations that work to re-home former racing Greyhounds, helping these very worthy dogs transition from a life on the track to a life in the home. One of the amazing things about Greyhounds is how quickly and well they usually make this transition.





If you are responsible enough to keep a dog on a leash, and/or you have a fenced in yard that can contain a dog, if you like to jog, hike, or throw balls or pull lures around a yard, or do other activities that a dog can participate in then a Greyhound would make an attractive companion.


 When you're done, then a Greyhound will cuddle up on the couch with you and relax. For a larger dog that needs regular exercise, Greyhounds might surprise you with what wonderful house dogs they make.


 They house train quickly and have an affinity for curling up and quietly napping in between bouts of exercise. They love people and most also enjoy the company of other dogs.









Many are also able to live with cats, although if you already live with cats I would suggest you make sure the dog you adopt has been cat tested; this is an aspect of temperament testing that rescue groups will assess a dog for.

Greyhounds also come in a range of colors, and slightly different builds. Some are slighter in size while others are well muscled and look very powerful. In general this is an athletically built dog that looks like it was bred to move.

 If you think you might be the right kind of person for a Greyhound, try checking the web for Greyhound rescue and adoption groups in your area. Greyhound rescue is also pretty great about helping dogs find ways to get to their new homes; transportation assistance is sometimes available.

17 comments:

  1. Ive always been told that greyhounds are big couch potatoes and great for apartments

    urban hounds

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    1. Ironic isn't it :) As long as they get their exercise Greyhounds can fit into pretty much any space that has a comfy place for them to stretch out and sleep.
      Thanks for stopping in!

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    2. On arriving in Inverness, Scotland, we noticed a newspaper advertisement to adopt a retired ex-racing greyhound and the cartoon was a greyhound with a suitcase and the caption was that he would be happy with a sofa and watching 'Emerdale' (that is an English soapie). That was in 2004, we adopted an abused 10 month old girl that had four homes in her short 10 months - we have now had her for nearly 8 years. She actually adopted us and liked our bed, which has now become hers and we (my husband and myself) share it with her!!! Then decided to adopt a male ex-racer. A beautiful black, shy male Irish greyhound. The poor thing did not know what a comfortable home was. I had to train him where to sleep and take him out to do his business. On walks we used to make excuses that we only just adopted him because his coat was in such a bad condition and he looked sad and 'abused', but our little girl taught him how to be a family dog. With tender loving care his coat is gleaming jet black, he loves his cuddles and loves to sit on my chaise or my husband's recliner!! We love to see him play like a puppy, which he never experienced - he does come from a long line of champions and takes after his mother - first through the gate and winning so many times. At five they are retired or ...... our boy was fortunate to be rescued and we would never ever consider any other dog now. They only need two 20 minute walks per day, a soft comfortable sofa or 'your' bed!!! My husband and myself have had all sorts of breeds and so have my siblings - but ex-racing greyhounds are the very best - they deserve a loving retirement - which our boy has. We love both of them to bits.

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    3. I'm so glad you found us and thank you for taking the time to share your personal experience with this wonderful breed!

      I love to share stories like yours; people who will take the time and effort to help a dog through the transition to being a member of their family end up having that investment repaid by the amazing companions the dog becomes. Thank you!

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  2. I adopted a 2 year-old greyhound 4 years ago and I have never had a better dog. Having known only cement floors, cages and the track, she mastered stairs and slippery floors the first day, and never EVER had an accident. Very routine-oriented because of track life, she adapted to our schedule smoothly. Gentle, loving, quiet, she is happy getting two 20 minute walks a day, and zooming around our back yard when the mood hits her. The rest of the time she is happy to sleep at our feet and ask for belly rubs. Greyhounds are great for families, seniors, singles, EVERYONE should save a life and make a fast friend by adopting a greyhound.

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    1. Thanks so much Sierra's mom for the first hand account! And if you'd like to share a picture or two please send them to cmoslund@gmail.com and we'll put them on this post :-)

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  3. Beautiful dogs!!! Thanks for the info.! I too have heard they make great cuddlers:)
    ♥Bev

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  4. Thank you for pointing out what greyt pets greyhounds make.

    Greyhound racing is cruel and inhumane. Greyhounds endure lives of nearly constant confinement, kept in cages barely large enough for them to stand up or turn around. While racing, many dogs suffer and die from injuries including broken legs, paralysis, and cardiac arrest. And many greyhounds are euthanized every year, as the number retired from racing exceeds the number of adoptive homes.

    At racetracks across the country, greyhounds endure lives of confinement. According to industry statements, greyhounds are generally confined in their cages for approximately 20 hours per day. They live inside warehouse-style kennels in stacked cages that are barely large enough to stand up or turn around. Generally, shredded paper or carpet remnants are used as bedding.

    An undercover video recently released by GREY2K USA shows the conditions in which these gentle dogs are forced to live: http://www.grey2kusa.org/azVideo.html

    For more information on injuries these dogs suffer, please view:


    http://www.grey2kusa.org/azInjuries.html

    http://www.grey2kusa.org/eNEWS/G2K-022811Email.html

    Dogs play an important role in our lives and deserve to be protected from industries and individuals that do them harm.

    VWolf Board Member, GREY2K USA

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  5. Are greyhounds particularly bad off-leash? Kathy

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    1. Is running a bad thing :-)

      General rule of thumb is exercise your off-leash Greyhound in a fenced in area until you've had time to really work on recall. And when you take your Greyhound off-leash you can't be anywhere near traffic. A beach run, though, actually is fine and I know of someone who exercises Greyhounds and Borzoi on a long beach stretch and the dogs love it.

      Just like a Beagle will run if they pick up a scent, if a Greyhound is in the woods and sees something like a rabbit, they will give chase.

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  6. Speaking of exercising pets - http://www.projectpetslimdown.com/ is a new project to promote exercising with pets and keeping them at a healthy weight, K

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  7. Can ex race dogs be clicker trained? I've had minimal contact with Greys and know they are lovely contact dogs but not sure they will respond to obedience training in the same way some other species will. Anyone have some good training tips for greys?

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    1. Greyhounds as a breed are trainable; it will depend on the individual dog how well he or she would respond to the clicker training method. Clicker systems work best with food motivated dogs and not all dogs are food motivated, regardless of their breed.

      Of course, what one is trying to train a dog to do will also impact success....

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  8. There are always bad people out in the world but I have seen many many greyhounds come into the foster stage after racing and have been in the house and loved like pets!!!! There kennels are alot bigger than just to turn around in.i don't know where you live but south Australia has a great homing rate for these lovely dogs.

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  9. My family has had two greyhounds. A year ago we lost our last one. They were both such a huge part of our family and we all loved them so much. his name was Wright and he was such a simple dog. He had his bed and all the toys in the world. He was content with anything you gave him. He didnt care if you curled up with him and cried about things that have happened that day. I have grown up with a greyhound in the house my whole entire life. If you are looking for an easily trained, docile, loving dog get a greyhound. They are seriously the most amazing, loving and beautiful dogs I have ever come in contact with. They honestly just appreciate a warm bed and food :)

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  10. Hillary, thank you for taking time to stop and share your wonderful experience with this breed :-) They certainly make amazing companions.

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