Discussing dog breeds, dog-adoption, and the human-canine connection.

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Bold Lead Designs' Infinity Lead: Stop the dog from pulling on a leash


I don't normally do product reviews.

Through another person's blog, however, I received some intel about a leash/head halter design that was light-weight and could fit basically any sized dog...and it WORKS. Since I live with a Labrador who appears to believe she was meant to be an oxen who pulls her walker like a plow through an unfurrowed field, I was very interested.



I ordered - paid for - one of these devices and IT WORKS. In fact, it worked for both the Lab and the Bull Terrier (the Collie is very polite and would never dream of trying to drag a human on a leash.) I thought there are other people out there trying to walk dogs who pull like sled dogs without a sled, so I have to share the information about this product.

Easier than usually walking Lil

Note: no one asked me to review this, I have not received anything in return for writing this review, and I liked this product enough to buy and gift one to my sister whose adopted Boxer mix pulls on the leash when excited.


I will also note that in the past I have used other products. I do like the Holt head halter however, it takes me a minute to get it on and Lil the Lab is not good at sitting patiently. Gracie cannot be walked on a Holt head halter (she rears up and can swipe it off her head, while walking.) I liked the idea of one device that I could switch between the two girls for sudden use. I liked the idea of something that was fairly quick to get off and on, and that was lightweight and small enough to fit into the front pocket of my jeans.


The Infinity Lead is made in Colorado, sold on the web through Bold Lead Designs, one of handful of specialized products they make:http://boldleaddesigns.com/product-category/infinity-training-aids/ .
It is a deceptively simple looking device. I use the four foot model, it also comes in six foot, and in leather.






The directions on putting this on the dog have the handler start by making the large loop - big enough to go over the dog's neck.




The loop is then flipped to form a figure eight, with the front of the figure eight fitting over the dog's nose.


Note: It may look in the picture to the right like the lead is coming down, below the head. No.
That is a second lead holding the "model" while I take pictures, as she has been known to bolt without warning. One of the differences with this design is that the lead comes up, and is at the back of the dog's head - if you look closely you can just see a piece of it behind Lil's head.





The leather tab fits tightly but is to be slid up/down to hold the correct size for the dog's head. It works well. When placed on the dog correctly the tab is in back of the head, between the ears.








Getting a clear picture once this was on proved a bit challenging. Not only was the day ending but Lil still found lots of interesting things to look at so we got a lot of blurred photos.









 Note that there is a metal clip to attach to the standard collar, should one's dog manage to slip their head out. Gracie tried to get this off when I tried it on her, and she did manage to put a small snag in the material, which can be seen in some of Lil's pictures. I think we'll eventually get the leather version.





Both Lil and Gracie tried to pull on this and both stopped pulling immediately. It is advertised as a training device that focuses the dog's attention on the handler. It works very well as designed for Lil. Gracie, as always, focused initially on trying to get it off as we walked. She wasn't successful and she would occasionally try to rub it off but it did work. I didn't get any pictures of Gracie tonight.






Notice the loose leash, and in the above picture the dog's ability to still open her mouth, lick her lips; it would be easy for the dog to drink with this on. After a few attempted pulls Lil stopped trying to pull. She walked nicely on the leash just as we've practiced doing but which normally doesn't happen.




On those occasions where Lil did get distracted and stopped suddenly, the back piece may have slid a little lower than it is supposed to sit - however, it did not affect her, cause discomfort, or cause her to stop listening. Lil's always had less focus than a squirrel on caffeine. At least now we can walk together while she takes in everything around us, without my arm being dislocated.






15 comments:

  1. Very interesting. Looks easy enough and if it works, that's all the better!!

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    1. I love the ease of use on this - I am in no way a mechanically inclined person and when I first got this, a friend read the directions out loud to me so I could form a mental picture (that may just be my dyslexia.) My point is, once you've figured it out once, you should be golden :-)

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  2. Great review. Looks easy enough to use and terrific that it works! (Great photos, too)

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    1. Thanks Sue - you're my product review mentor!

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  3. Great review. I have a friend with a dog that could really use this.

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    1. Not everyone is polite on a leash; this sure helps!

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  4. I saw this on a dog recently.
    I had no idea what it was, Thanks
    for the information!

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    1. Thanks for stopping in! We'll be returning the visit :-)

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  5. I use one of these for my Service Dog. Not because he pulls, it is easier for my wife to put on than his Halti and he doesn't seem to mind it.

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    1. Which raises another point - anyone looking for a solid service dog harness - this company also makes them.

      I'm sure your service dog would make Lil look even MORE shameful than she does compared to regular, non-working dogs. :-)

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  6. Glad its working for you, we have seen these. Weasley is such a puller but as a pug he wears a harness, no snout, we tried a no pull harness with limited success. thanks for your kind words on my new blog by the way

    urban hounds

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    1. Love the new blog :-)

      The slope nosed dogs like Bull Terriers, and no nose dogs like Pugs, Shar Pei and Bull Dogs may still be best served by a harness. I'd need to do more actual testing to decide.

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    2. I have a "slope nose blocky head" dog :) and though I do like my harness for most daily use on occasion I use this infinity halter. It stays in place, doesn't slip or get too close to the eyes. I keep it in my pocket and if we have a "rough patch" pull fest while out walking I just slip it on and pulling just stops. Great product.

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  7. looks good,and easy to fit
    nb photos would have been clearer on the one twisting it to figure 8 to fit over nose if you'd used a diffrent colour lead to the one you were fitting to hold onto the dog whilst you did photos, using a lead the same colour made it confusing

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    1. Actually, I did use a different color lead :-) Silver vs. Pink/brown. What you may be noticing is the backup section of the lead, that connects to the collar - it doesn't actually play a role in controlling the dog, it just is there in case the dog gets their head out of the main section - you still have the leash attached to the collar.

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