Discussing dog breeds, dog-adoption, and the human-canine connection.

Sunday, February 16, 2014

Dachshund: The Badger Dog Needs more Homes


http://www.drna.org/

Dachshund Rescue of North America reminds us that not only are doxies waiting in rescue, there are senior doxies, who at this very moment are waiting for their special someone to discover them and take them home. One doesn't have to be in North America however, to adopt a Dachshund. This sturdy, strong dog can be found throughout the world. We all know, where there are dogs, there are dogs waiting to be adopted into safe and loving homes.




 The Dachshund is a rugged, solid dog and I think people sometimes forget that these feisty, loyal dogs are hounds - hard working, brave hounds who were bred to fight a badger to the death if necessary.








Actually, two sizes of Dachshund were developed; the larger dogs hunted not just badgers but sometimes even boars, while the smaller variety would hunt rabbits and sometimes fox. Eventually three coat types developed: Wired, Short, and Long. The coat types and large range of colors can be found in both the standard and miniature variety.






Fortunately, most of us no longer live in a way that requires us to root badgers off our farms or hunt hares for our dinner. And equally fortunate, this is a breed that is well suited to being a family companion. Very devoted to their people, this is a loyal and trainable breed. Given the strong personality this is a breed that also should be given positive socialization and training from a young age.










They may not be tall but the doxie is a willing watch dog and can be suspicious of strangers, particularly if they are not given adequate socialization from a young age. Like most hounds though, this is a breed with eyes that showcase sensitive souls; they long for regular human companionship and will pine if left alone too frequently. Doxies need quality time with their people.





Originally the breed had a longer leg. As their height has decreased, while their back has if anything increased in length, there has developed a tendency for medical problems with their spine. This breed is a poster-dog for providing a set of steps to allow safer access on/off furniture, including human beds.





They should be discouraged from jumping on and off tall objects - although with their often athletic instincts they are more than willing to jump. This is also a breed that still loves to run and they should be provided with opportunities for safe exercise.








Loyal. Loving. Brave. Don't these sound like ideal characteristics for a family companion? The Dachshund - a mighty dog in a short but solid package.






4 comments:

  1. Great post! Thanks for joining the blog hop. Will share.

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  2. I adore Doxies! In fact, I keep threatening to add one to the pack. I'll try and make this short. My mom was bedridden for a little over a year (long story). During that time their Beagle died. A friend and I brought my mom a rescue Dachshund about a year old. Hansel walked in and knew immediately he was my mom's dog. He'd wait an hour by the back door if it took that long for her to get there (as she was recovering and learning to walk again.) Ditto waiting for the leash to be hooked. He was an angel that gave her the will to recover.

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    Replies
    1. What a wonderful gift they were able to give each other :-) And I think you should decidedly add one to your pack - after all you have no one representing 'short and long' in the family!

      I'm sure your husband will thank me for this advice ;-)
      I also feel like a doxie could be in my future, particularly a senior.

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