Discussing dog breeds, dog-adoption, and the human-canine connection.

Sunday, March 9, 2014

Sighthound: Borzoi (Russian Wolfhound)


I'm guessing that at least a few readers who stop by here walk around, like I do, with a list of dogs in mind that they would happily live with. High up on my list would be the Borzoi.








A tall, elegant looking breed, the Borzoi has a quiet nature that is far less demanding than the average terrier. Sensitive and intelligent, these big dogs are very capable of quietly watching the world as long as they are given several good walks or runs a day.










 As with all sighthounds, Borzoi were originally breed to hunt game and run it to ground. As a result, this is a breed that does enjoy an opportunity to stretch their legs.










 At the same time, once they've had their exercise they settle down very nicely. As a sighthound though, be aware that when out - which should always be on-lead or in a fenced in area - they are prone to chasing quick movements. A dog that might be fine with the family cat inside, might respond differently if the cat were to run across the yard outside.




They can also be a bit independent - again a natural trait of a breed that was designed to work out in front, and well ahead of people; they couldn't be successful if they waited for a person to tell them what to do.







 A combination of strong instinct and an ability to think and react fast remain part of the breed. Some individuals are also rather comical, another trait we're rather fond of here at saved by dogs.







Overall, this is a gentle breed who despite their size do not make the best watch dogs - if that is, you expect a watch dog to bark. If you want a dog that is likely to just watch, however, then this is an ideal breed!








They're very observant without being terribly judgmental. They won't necessarily object to people wandering in and out of the house; which is good if you have a number of welcome visitors. If you want a dog to raise an alarm, however, you're better off doing what nobility often did and keeping some back-up terriers, who are always more than willing to bark.



They've also become rather accustomed to creature comforts.

If you want to live with dogs who have spent generations with royalty, then you need to be prepared to meet some of their simple needs - a chair or couch with a view being chief among these. They are after all sighthounds, and want to be able to see what is happening.
















17 comments:

  1. What majestic looking dogs. They really look like they rule the kingdom instead of chasing prey.

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    1. Typically these days they do spend more time surveying their domains then hunting - although they do still enjoy lure coursing :-)

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  2. such beautiful dogs, I used to see one regularly in Manhattan and it just looked right at home on the upper east side, very posh

    retro rover

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    1. What an excellent description of them - they are indeed a posh dog :-)

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  3. Oh this is my dream dog from before I adopted a dog!! From what I've read, he sounds almost like a cat in some ways :P ... not too mention it would be fun to introduce the Borzoi as - this is my dog... he is one of the stupidest/least intelligent dog breed in the world! - I make such a mean dog human, I know! But that will remain a dream since he's pretty expensive to upkeep...and we're quite happy with Donna. ;D

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    1. Hounds tend not to score well in "intelligent tests" that rate trainability for non-instinct driven tasks above all else - particularly since they were often bred to work independently. If one wants a dog to train for obedience, then any member of the hound group probably won't be on the list of potential dogs.

      But just like not being able to do math doesn't mean a person isn't smart, not being quick to train for certain kinds of tasks doesn't mean a dog isn't clever in other areas. That said - having trained Donna, you would certainly find a Borzoi a very different kind of dog :-)

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    2. I hope I get to meet a borzoi one day!!

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  4. Wow, they're beautiful. That does look like a fun breed.

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    1. They tend to have really lovely personalities :-)

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  5. Now you've gone and done it. I. Love. Borzoi. Crazy in love. I have sworn for years I'd have one of my own. Tri color, please. The dog daddy is a total killjoy and has always said they're too big. Now that it turns our Rudy is a giant Lab (part pony maybe - and the dog daddy picked him) that excuse no longer flies. I met some Borzoi when I was in Russia and it was one of the highlights of my life. I'll go away now... and dream of Borzoi...

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    1. The great thing about Borzoi is that despite being tall, they don't feel a need to sprawl in the middle of the room - they're perfectly happy to lay on a chair out of the way :-)
      Anyone in my current crew can easily take up more room and be louder than the average Borzoi- I'm with you Sue - someday....

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    2. I can't help but chip in and say that Donna definitely feels the need to sprawl in the middle of any room. ;)

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    3. Donna knows that she's vital to the running of your world, so she needs to be in the center of all that happens. :-)

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  6. They certainly are beautiful!

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    1. They are, aren't they :-) Thanks for stopping in!

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  7. They're beautiful and elegant dogs. It was nice to learn more about them.

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    1. Thank you for stopping in - we enjoy reflecting on the variety of pups out in the world and sometimes people chime in and share stories about dogs they've known. We shall have to talk about GP soon :-)

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