Discussing dog breeds, dog-adoption, and the human-canine connection.

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Kerry Blue Terrier





Developed as an all purpose breed in Ireland, the Kerry is an energetic and robust terrier. Admittedly, saying a terrier is energetic and robust is redundant, however, the Kerry is active even by terrier standards.











Like most terriers, a Kerry can be counted on for vermin patrol. Additionally, they have been used as farm dogs, as hunters and retrievers -- this is a truly multi purpose breed that was up to filling multiple needs for their people.









The refined look that comes from grooming, however, was not an early trademark of the breed. The Kerry was a rougher looking dog before they became popular off the farm and out of the highlands of County Kerry. Once they attracted the attention of English fanciers and were cleaned up though, their popularity quickly spread to bench shows.






The Kerry continues to be a breed that is at home in the show ring, family room, and in vermin competitions.












This is a breed that needs an even hand, exercise, training, and has a sense of fairness and fun. Best introduced to smaller animals/cats at a young age, their strong sense of prey drive means they may not do well with cats or bunnies should they only meet them later in life. Many terriers automatically chase that which moves quickly and Kerrys are no exception to this rule.





A Kerry pup is born black and with time and grooming their coat will lighten to the characteristic "blue". Grooming is also necessary to keep a Kerry looking like a Kerry and not a pile of animated hair - or a different kind of dog.






Sometimes people are attracted by the handsome looks and cheerful personality without realizing the bundle of energy and grooming requirements it takes to keep a Kerry healthy and looking like a typical member of the breed.








As a result of people sometimes obtaining a Kerry without realizing what they're actually signing on for, members of the breed require new homes and can be found through rescue. Retired show dogs also may be looking for a home once their career in the show ring is over.









This is a devoted, multi purpose, clever breed that can turn their paws and noses to many kinds of work. As a very low-shed breed they also are on the list of possible breeds for those with allergies. This is yet another breed on my list of maybe someday dogs. Handsome, fun, and just-independent-enough to make things interesting.







14 comments:

  1. Kerrys are really cute! Definitely too active for me but they are a great breed
    retro rover

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    1. I do find them attractive - and I think they'd look great in a Trekkie outfit ;-)

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  2. That is a beautiful dog... and I'm glad you highlighted the fact that they're a bundle of energy! That's good for any prospective owner to know!

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    1. I agree - people should always have some idea of the requirements that are part of owning any dog.

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  3. Those puppies are cute! I had no idea that they had black coats to begin with.
    They are very handsome dogs but it is important to be aware of the exercise and grooming requirements before getting a dog.

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    1. Indeed - understanding the work (or expense) of owning a certain kind of dog should be something people consider before bringing a pup home to live with them. This is at least a 12-15 year commitment!

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  4. Interesting! They are so unique looking!
    ღ husky hugz ღ frum our pack at Love is being owned by a husky!

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    1. Part of that look is the hair cut - they look a lot like a hairy dog when they aren't groomed :-)

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  5. Wonderful active breed. Love the pictures. I think the grooming alone would loose me. :)

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    1. Yes, the grooming is the work of a professional in my opinion :-)

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  6. Animated hair. Haha! That last picture is a little strange.... it looks like the dog doesn't have a head. Only a bushel of hair!

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    1. :-) Guessing that the Kerry will not be on your list of must have dogs! They do rely allot on a good hair cut.

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  7. Gorgeous breed, but I know they're not for me. Just not cut out for a dog that requires such grooming. I had no idea the puppies were all born black, but thinking about it makes perfect sense. I've seen similar color changes in our "grey" Percheron horses. In their senior years they become white. Does the Kerry coloring lighten with age?

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  8. It does lighten with age.
    Reminds me of my second mini-schnauzer - he started out black as a pup and as a senior was a grey-blue. To me Schnauzers are an easier groom than a Kerry. I would think it is challenging learning to get the leggings on a Kerry so uniform. Attention to details are not always my strong suit ;-)

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